Science Revealed by Reverend Nemu to be published shortly

Science RevealedScience Revealed by Reverend Nemu is our first publication of 2014, and is setting the bar particularly high. The first part of the Nemu’s End Trilogy: The History, Psychology, and Poetry of the Apocalypse, will be released by the end of January. Exclusively available, and ready to pre-order, through the Psychedelic Press online bookshop.

£6.99 – 180pp – Science/Religion – ISBN:  9780992808808

NEMU’S END TRILOGY

A•po•ca•lypse – / ə•pä•kə•lips /
revelation, disclosure, discovery
From Gk: apo- “from” + kalyptein “to cover, conceal”

An apocalypse occurs when the hidden is revealed, when the unconscious becomes conscious, when something waiting undercover is discovered and has its cover dissed. Nemu’s End is about this process, about how limitations arise in our worlds and in our minds, and what happens when they fall, both collectively in society and individually in our brains.

The process of apocalypse can be seen at work in scientific discovery, in the psychology of non-normal states, and in transformative catastrophes in evolutionary and social history. Despite the inelegance of street preachers and the disinterest of the sensible majority, the apocalypse is relevant to our lives, and becoming more so every day.

Rational materialism is a bulldozer lurching down a dark cul-de-sac at the end of the world. Revelation is a magick bus bouncing down the path of understanding towards the light. With the wisdom of fools and the tricks of magicians, we can slip free of the loops of linguistics and law, and experience a world far more responsive and enchanted than is immediately obvious.

– SCIENCE REVEALED –

‘Science Revealed’ considers the apocalypse in science as discovery. Biographies of scientists including Tesla and Einstein reveal how our most groundbreaking ideas result not from rational thinking and tapping on calculators, but from visions, dreams, feverish delirium and other non-rational revelations. The controversies that blow up when such insights clash with received wisdom are often resolved in a manner most unscientific, and this is just one of the ways in which what is simplistically called ‘rationalism’ often obscures truth in a fundamentally complex world.

– ABOUT THE AUTHOR –

The Reverend Nemu incarnated one night in Japan into the body of an English teacher with a background in the History and Philosophy of Science and an interest in psychedelics.

The earthbound medium and the astral clergyman share an interest in why people believe the things they do, and what is possible when we start entertaining more weird and wonderful ideas about our universe and our potentials. The two get on well enough, but one can be something of a pedant, and the other is prone to flights of fancy.

They traveled together to the Amazon, to explore the Santo Daime ayahuasca current which the pedant had been initiated into. There, a highly aggressive and potentially fatal bacterial parasite called leishmaniasis colonised a few inches of his chest, with designs on much more. As this is considered untreatable with traditional medicine, it provided the perfect opportunity to test the power of ayahuasca ritual.

Leishmaniasis was no match for eight months of diets, ritual and plant medicine. The impact of the cure went beyond the physical, leading to a profound scepticism about the rules of western medicine and the cosmology upon which it rests, as well as a deep respect for the complexity and intelligence of the natural world.

It also lent a certain twist to the series, which was tempered during this period, and made the author of Nemu’s End the most compelling and optimistic apocalyptic in the jungle.

Via the House

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3 Responses

  1. Brian Akers says:

    ” setting the barrier” (“particularly high”)?

    Never heard that figure of speech before. Interesting.

    Of course, we’re all familiar with the expression ‘setting the bar’ – i.e. a critical standard in a test. Like a hurdle an athlete has to pole vault. Or the Limbo, where its about getting under (not over). How low can you go – not how high you can jump.

    Either way (correct me), set however high or low – a bar is a long, thin structure. A barrier on the other hand, seems to me, is something completely different. Like, an obstacle or obstruction, to stop something from getting past a certain point. Many types, many purposes apply to the word. For example: something to stop sperm from getting to an egg cell under circumstances it otherwise might occur, for purpose (to prevent fertilization).

    I can only wonder. Is there something that figure of speech (taken as is) alludes to? Something that might cross a threshold undesirably – that (as considered) needs to be stopped? Something that would thus indicate need for a barrier to be set. If so – what?

    Or was it a typo, mere slip – as the context (i.e. ‘how high’) suggests? Presumably facilitated by similarity of the words ‘barrier’ and ‘bar’ – in form at least, if not meaning? That’d be less perplexing in some ways. But in that case – how might one mitigate an impression of something starkly Freudian-like in such an ‘oops’ – something telling? Or ‘telling on’ (as it were).

    Rather curious on informed impression – per spidey-sense especially. A bit.

  2. Brian Akers says:

    ” setting the barrier” (“particularly high”)?

    Never heard that figure of speech before. Interesting.

    Of course, we’re all familiar with the expression ‘setting the bar’ – i.e. a critical standard in a test. Like a hurdle an athlete has to pole vault. Or the Limbo, where its about getting under (not over). How low can you go – not how high you can jump.

    Either way (correct me), set however high or low – a bar is a long, thin structure. A barrier on the other hand, seems to me, is something completely different. Like, an obstacle or obstruction, to stop something from getting past a certain point. Many types, many purposes apply to the word. For example: something to stop sperm from getting to an egg cell under circumstances it otherwise might occur, for purpose (to prevent fertilization).

    I can only wonder. Is there something that figure of speech (taken as is) alludes to? Something that might cross a threshold undesirably – that (as considered) needs to be stopped? Something that would thus indicate need for a barrier to be set. If so – what?

    Or was it a typo, mere slip – as the context (i.e. ‘how high’) suggests? Presumably facilitated by similarity of the words ‘barrier’ and ‘bar’ – in form at least, if not meaning? That’d be less perplexing in some ways. But in that case – how might one mitigate an impression of something starkly Freudian-like in such an ‘oops’ – something telling? Or ‘telling on’ (as it were).

    Rather curious on informed impression – per spidey-sense especially. A bit.

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